- min read

Cashel Campbell (she/her) is an experienced provider of psychotherapy, dance/movement therapy and recreation therapy. She facilitates Leda's dance and movement Healing Circles, helping participants to connect with their bodies in a way that promotes skill-building and positive self-esteem.

Can you tell me a little bit about where you're from and where you grew up?  

Sure! I am Cashel Campbell. I am from Long Island, New York – specifically Roosevelt, Long Island, New York. I grew up in a very suburban environment with the opportunity to go to the city and the five boroughs, like as often as I probably wanted. 

I have a lot of family; my parents are Caribbean. My mom is from Guyana, and my dad is from Jamaica. Most of the Caribbean people who come to New York go to Brooklyn, so I spent a lot of time in Brooklyn hanging out with family, and I think my exposure to different environments really impressed upon me the importance of people and their differences from a really early age.  

What drew you into movement and dance healing?  

My parents met working for Pan Am Airlines in the 80s and so because of that they – well both of them kind of, but one of them maintained a career working for the airline. She took me to many countries from very early on in my life – the Caribbean, I remember I went to Sweden when I was like 14, and we went to South Africa. I think the cultural diversity, and just seeing, and the whole gamut of how people can live, just really inspired the creative part of me. 

I came out of the womb creative, and I think that my earlier forms of dance that I was really attached to, outside of the classic structure of dance, ballet, jazz, tap – In my 20s, I was a belly dancer, I performed and taught classes and stuff like that – but with my otherworldly understanding of people, the nuances, esoteric, living in the power of dance and belly dance. I was really enchanted by the East and brought that into the settings of teaching dance.  

I just felt like there’s something more here. That patterned me to look into dance therapy, and how I can become a dance therapist. Having been in therapy since I was very young, I knew how powerful therapy was if you just allowed yourself to be in the process. I think I just found the meeting place for both of them.  

What is it about movement and dance that you find healing?  

The body. I mean, our bodies. Our first homes, your first home is your body. The thing that is being tracked and informed when you’re in utero. There’s a baby this big, and there’s a baby that big, and so I think that, outside of the people who nurture you in your environment, your body really is your oldest friend. It’s the first thing that groups around you. 

I look at it as it grounds your heart around your soul, and it has information about who you are and who you want to become too. And I just find that if you can allow yourself to get in there by dancing, or being an athlete, or composing music, or you know, whatever means you engage with your body to express yourself, I think you’ll find that there’s a healing value in that.  

You invented FlexTech, which is a unique form of movement healing. Could you tell us a bit more about this technique and how you came to create it?  

Flextech was really born out of my own experience of feeling what it's like to progress through rest, recovery and pursuing strength training in your own body. It's really like this marriage of like all the places that I engage in - A movement for training purposes, like yoga, flexibility, training, cardio, and then just bringing in that somatic element and the aspects of dance therapy. 

But there’s something really rewarding I’ve discovered in my own body, about pushing my body and my heart rate up, and then gratifying it instantly with rest and recovery and then doing it over and over again. I think that in some way it mimics the experience of our lives. Because we exert ourselves and then we all find a way to go to bed at night. 

Just seeing the commonality in those contrasting points, and what it felt like in my body, I always felt very accomplished at the end, and also very nurtured at the same time. I wanted to create something that could have all of that housed together.  

Thank you for sharing that! I know you started your counseling practice, Feel Heal Dance, in 2018, and you use a holistic approach that combines talk therapy, Reiki, intuitive counseling and soulography, which is a pole dance as therapy intervention. What's your experience like as an innovator within the movement healing field? Because usually, when you hear about movement healing, you hear about dance and yoga only, and other types of holistic approaches are less common. 

Yeah, wow, you say innovating. I feel so inspired by that. Yeah, I think that one of the things that sticks out to me about the healing journey, as I would classify myself creatively as a visionary and innovator, that just how it comes to me -  I'm always looking to do something that hasn't been done because there are people to me, that means that there are people out there who haven't been served, and I wonder if what I create can serve those people who are underserved. You know these approaches that are a little less conventional to dance therapy, are really just about offering people an experience of themselves in ways that they may not organically look for. 

It's similar to how people go to the movies, or try different restaurants, or even express themselves in fashion. You don't know who you are or who you could become, without giving yourself the opportunity to try yourself on in a different way. I think, especially when you're talking and thinking about healing trauma. 

I think something like that is really important because trauma is different, how it came to them is different, they approach it, how it shows up, the sporadic nature of it, and you never know what modality of movement or style of movement will speak to someone to help them kind of grasp onto it and help themselves heal.

We'd like to thank Cashel for taking the time to speak with us. Tune in later this summer for the second part of this interview!

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Get to Know Cashel Campbell, Leda's Movement and Dance Facilitator

Cashel Campbell (she/her) is an experienced provider of psychotherapy, dance/movement therapy and recreation therapy. She facilitates Leda's dance and movement Healing Circles, helping participants to connect with their bodies in a way that promotes skill-building and positive self-esteem.

Can you tell me a little bit about where you're from and where you grew up?  

Sure! I am Cashel Campbell. I am from Long Island, New York – specifically Roosevelt, Long Island, New York. I grew up in a very suburban environment with the opportunity to go to the city and the five boroughs, like as often as I probably wanted. 

I have a lot of family; my parents are Caribbean. My mom is from Guyana, and my dad is from Jamaica. Most of the Caribbean people who come to New York go to Brooklyn, so I spent a lot of time in Brooklyn hanging out with family, and I think my exposure to different environments really impressed upon me the importance of people and their differences from a really early age.  

What drew you into movement and dance healing?  

My parents met working for Pan Am Airlines in the 80s and so because of that they – well both of them kind of, but one of them maintained a career working for the airline. She took me to many countries from very early on in my life – the Caribbean, I remember I went to Sweden when I was like 14, and we went to South Africa. I think the cultural diversity, and just seeing, and the whole gamut of how people can live, just really inspired the creative part of me. 

I came out of the womb creative, and I think that my earlier forms of dance that I was really attached to, outside of the classic structure of dance, ballet, jazz, tap – In my 20s, I was a belly dancer, I performed and taught classes and stuff like that – but with my otherworldly understanding of people, the nuances, esoteric, living in the power of dance and belly dance. I was really enchanted by the East and brought that into the settings of teaching dance.  

I just felt like there’s something more here. That patterned me to look into dance therapy, and how I can become a dance therapist. Having been in therapy since I was very young, I knew how powerful therapy was if you just allowed yourself to be in the process. I think I just found the meeting place for both of them.  

What is it about movement and dance that you find healing?  

The body. I mean, our bodies. Our first homes, your first home is your body. The thing that is being tracked and informed when you’re in utero. There’s a baby this big, and there’s a baby that big, and so I think that, outside of the people who nurture you in your environment, your body really is your oldest friend. It’s the first thing that groups around you. 

I look at it as it grounds your heart around your soul, and it has information about who you are and who you want to become too. And I just find that if you can allow yourself to get in there by dancing, or being an athlete, or composing music, or you know, whatever means you engage with your body to express yourself, I think you’ll find that there’s a healing value in that.  

You invented FlexTech, which is a unique form of movement healing. Could you tell us a bit more about this technique and how you came to create it?  

Flextech was really born out of my own experience of feeling what it's like to progress through rest, recovery and pursuing strength training in your own body. It's really like this marriage of like all the places that I engage in - A movement for training purposes, like yoga, flexibility, training, cardio, and then just bringing in that somatic element and the aspects of dance therapy. 

But there’s something really rewarding I’ve discovered in my own body, about pushing my body and my heart rate up, and then gratifying it instantly with rest and recovery and then doing it over and over again. I think that in some way it mimics the experience of our lives. Because we exert ourselves and then we all find a way to go to bed at night. 

Just seeing the commonality in those contrasting points, and what it felt like in my body, I always felt very accomplished at the end, and also very nurtured at the same time. I wanted to create something that could have all of that housed together.  

Thank you for sharing that! I know you started your counseling practice, Feel Heal Dance, in 2018, and you use a holistic approach that combines talk therapy, Reiki, intuitive counseling and soulography, which is a pole dance as therapy intervention. What's your experience like as an innovator within the movement healing field? Because usually, when you hear about movement healing, you hear about dance and yoga only, and other types of holistic approaches are less common. 

Yeah, wow, you say innovating. I feel so inspired by that. Yeah, I think that one of the things that sticks out to me about the healing journey, as I would classify myself creatively as a visionary and innovator, that just how it comes to me -  I'm always looking to do something that hasn't been done because there are people to me, that means that there are people out there who haven't been served, and I wonder if what I create can serve those people who are underserved. You know these approaches that are a little less conventional to dance therapy, are really just about offering people an experience of themselves in ways that they may not organically look for. 

It's similar to how people go to the movies, or try different restaurants, or even express themselves in fashion. You don't know who you are or who you could become, without giving yourself the opportunity to try yourself on in a different way. I think, especially when you're talking and thinking about healing trauma. 

I think something like that is really important because trauma is different, how it came to them is different, they approach it, how it shows up, the sporadic nature of it, and you never know what modality of movement or style of movement will speak to someone to help them kind of grasp onto it and help themselves heal.

We'd like to thank Cashel for taking the time to speak with us. Tune in later this summer for the second part of this interview!

Leda Health’s services are not replacements for the care of licensed medical professionals. Always seek advice from your physician or another health provider for any and all medical conditions. If you are in an emergency or need immediate medical care, call 911. Text "Leda" to 741741 to speak with a compassionate, trained Crisis Counselor. Confidential support 24/7, for free.